Back to the Globe

After my day of recovering, I was up and at it again. It was yet another exhausting day. However, I feel I have gotten my final wind for the last two days.

Yesterday, it was back to the Globe Theatre for another grueling stand with the groundlings performance, this time Julius Caesar. 

We headed out a little early in order to go by Waterloo station and re-purchase train tickets to Hampton Court. (As I write this, we have just returned from there but, that is tomorrow’s entry.). After securing the tickets we walked up to the theatre. On the way, we came down this beautiful little street. Roupell Street. It was the row houses I have come to recognize but these had a simplicity that was charming. The doors were the only thing that set the  apart individually.  My favorite was a red, then orange, then purple and on. Christina loved the pale blue so that was the one I photographed.

Roupell Street.  We found this charming little street on the way from Waterloo Station to the Tate Modern on Southbank.

Roupell Street. We found this charming little street on the way from Waterloo Station to the Tate Modern on Southbank.

Christina wanted the one with the blue door.

Christina wanted the one with the blue door.

Once we got to the river, we went into the Tate Modern Art Museum to look at some of the galleries before class met. We decided to meet on the lawn in front of the museum. I got through a couple of galleries and include a couple of my favorite paintings.  The museum is another good example of how the British re purpose buildings. The building was the old oil fired power station for the city. The museum spaces are quite wonderful. Large and spacious.  You never feel crowded no matter how many people are in the galleries.

Part of the lobby of the Tate Modern. This museum is an incredible example of how the English re purpose builings. It seems to have been an old warehouse.

Part of the lobby of the Tate Modern. This museum is an incredible example of how the English re purpose buildings. It seems to have been an old warehouse.

Yellow Islands (1952) by Jackson Pollack.

Yellow Islands (1952) by Jackson Pollack.

 

Picasso's Seated Nude from 1909-10.

Picasso’s Seated Nude from 1909-10.

After class we moved up to the Globe Theatre in order to get in line early to secure good spots in the courtyard.  I, of course was not interested in being too close again. Once the line queued into the courtyard it was a short wait but, while we waited a couple of the actors came out and we were treated to a puppet show (comic-they were quite brilliant) about Caesar.

Poster for Julius Caesar at the Globe.

Poster for Julius Caesar at the Globe.

This bench is part of a public art project going on in London celebrating the writers of England.  This, in front of the Globe,  is Shakespeare.

This bench is part of a public art project going on in London celebrating the writers of England. This, in front of the Globe, is Shakespeare.

The puppet show just prior to the production.

The puppet show just prior to the production.

The doors opened and I secured a good spot at the back. Everyone else went to the front this time. I soon realized this might not be a good thing. I was standing in the sun and judging from its position it seemed unlikely to be obscured during the performance. I was joined by two charming ladies and we struck up a conversation.  They wanted to know where I was from and how long I had been in London etc. They were friends who liked coming to theatre and they were so excited to be at the performance.

The performance, again, was excellent but, not as strong as Titus. The act break for this performance came after Caesar’s funeral and Act II becomes basically battle after battle as they try to round up the conspirators.  There were some strong performances but, they were much more uneven. Mark Antony and Casca were particular standouts.  The design was standard practice which means they employ Renaissance costumes (with Roman suggestion) and staging. This allowed the audience to see what it might have looked like in Shakespeare’s time.  It allowed you to see the weakness in the play. He wrote this for the opening of the original Globe Theatre and the commentary in the program explains he wrote to ensure success. As a result he took no risks concentrating on long speeches with no humor to offset the tragedy.

At intermission, I was feeling the heat and my two new friends sought cooler area with no sun wjile I stuck it out. For my trouble, I got a little too much sun but, I survived until the end.

Vikki had invited us up to Walthamstow to have dinner. This was a long ride on the tube. We had just enough time to stop for frozen yogurt and change (I needed to after standing in the heat for 3 hours).  We needed to by an extension for our tube passes since we would be going into zone 3. The ride up was packed tight – rush hour.

I managed to get us lost or not lost but a great deal of confusion and we arrived 20 min late. Vikki and Adam were the most gracious hosts and we enjoyed dinner very much. After some excellent wine and good conversation we made out way home in order to get ready for the next day (which is currently almost over but, you will have to wait for that til tomorrow.

 

Finally, a photo op with Vikki.

Finally, a photo op with Vikki.

V & A (Vikki and Adam) our dinner hosts. It was delightful to spend the evening with these charming people.

V & A (Vikki and Adam) our dinner hosts. It was delightful to spend the evening with these charming people.