Back to the theatre

Good morning. After two days of not attending the theatre I am back tonight. Sorry, I did not get the post up last evening but I was really tired.

I returned to the National Portrait Gallery late in the morning in order to more closely observe some of the paintings and snap a few more pictures. On the way I passed by St. Martin-in-the-Fields church.

Church St. Martin-in-the-Fields near the National Gallery.

Church St. Martin-in-the-Fields near the National Gallery.

Detail of the stone work St. Martin-in-the-Fields.

Detail of the stone work St. Martin-in-the-Fields.

I got to the gallery and took a moment to acclimate.  Couldn’t resist another look at the portrait of Princess Catherine but, was primarily interested in the Tudor/Elizabethan portraits and went as far as the 18th century.

Henry VIII in a drawing by Hans Holbein with his father Henry VII

Henry VIII in a drawing by Hans Holbein with his father Henry VII

Elizabeth I coronation portrait

Elizabeth I coronation portrait

Skirt decoration detail of the previously posted "Ditchley" portrait of Elizabeth I

Skirt decoration detail of the previously posted “Ditchley” portrait of Elizabeth I

Bodice skirt detail Anne of Denmark portrait.  She married James I.

Bodice skirt detail Anne of Denmark portrait. She married James I.

Detail Charles I portrait

Doublet and breeches (called slops) detail from Charles I portrait as Prince of Wales.

Sleeve detail of Charles I doublet as king

Sleeve detail of Charles I doublet as king

Chemise detail from Nell Gwynn portrait

Chemise detail from Nell Gwynn portrait

I am fascinated with being able to see painting techniques to achieve certain effects and you simple cannot see that in a photograph of a painting.  In the 18th century section I found this guy and include him for my friend Danny.

Portrait Henry Purcell. This one is for Danny.

Portrait Henry Purcell. This one is for Danny.

I finished up at the NPG and did a little run through the gift shop (never can resist that). While I checking out, Christina called.  She had completed her errands and she joined me for lunch. We lunched at the National Gallery next door and then went through the museum.  Sorry, no photography allowed. It was an intense afternoon of museum browsing. After two full galleries that included the 17th century and the 18th – early 20th century she had had enough but, there was still two more hours and while I was exhausted I still wanted to see the late Medieval Renaissance galleries. That was a mistake probably because I began suffering from severe museum fatigue by the time I left but, I didn’t think I would be able to make it back. Here is an over view of the galleries I went through from the museum guide.

Overview of the 13th - 15th century galleries

Overview of the 13th – 15th century galleries

Overview of the 16th century Galleries

Overview of the 16th century Galleries

Overview of the 17th  century galleries

Overview of the 17th century galleries

Overview of the 18th - early 20th century galleries

Overview of the 18th – early 20th century galleries

I couldn’t get to the Arnolfini portrait.  I did see it but, couldn’t really get close due to the crowd and I was too tired. I didn’t see the Van Gogh paintings.  Just missed them.

In the evening we attended a play called Let the Right One In.  It is based on a Swedish film from 2008 and novel of the same name. It was hauntingly beautiful, appropriate as it is a vampire story. The setting was stunning and it tells the story in a rather abstract manner befitting the gothic nature of the story. A good deal of stylized movement and a lot blood.  The acting was first rate. I was struck by the parallel with the Curious Incident – marginalized teen-age boy. Of course this has been a bloody summer of plays with this, Titus and tonight we are seeing Medea at the National Theatre.

 

Program cover Let The Right One In

Program cover Let The Right One In