Bath

The trip to Bath yesterday was like walking through another museum. The village/town is a walk into history. Quite frankly,  I find it almost impossible to describe in words the experience.  Looking back over my journal of the last two weeks, I use superlative after superlative to describe this experience.  I have to ask myself at what point does that become redundant?

Bath is essentially a city of the Georgian period and you will see from the architecture that is obvious.  However the ancient Romans in the 1st century CE discovered the mineral rich water warmed naturally was a source of healing which the Georgians continued in “taking the waters”. They still exist but are no longer used. The Royal Crescent was designed by John Wood and built in the second half of the 18th century.  There are 30 individual houses within the structure with No. 1 a restored museum (sorry, no pictures) of a Georgian town home. It was a delightful tour. Bath Abbey was built during Saxon times around 1499. It is in the lower section of town. The main reason for my trip was to visit the Fashion Museum of Bath. The museum is an internationally recognized destination for the research and exhibition of fashion dating from the 17th century thru the present day. We also passed through The Circus on our way to the Royal Crescent which is a roundabout with Georgian town homes in a smaller version of the Crescent.

We enjoyed lunch at an excellent Italian restaurant – Carluccios.

 

This is how we entered the town.

This is how we entered the town.

Bath Abbey. We couldn't go in this day. We later discovered there was a graduation ceremony taking place on this day.

Bath Abbey. We couldn’t go in this day. We later discovered there was a graduation ceremony taking place on this day.

This is the back of Bath Abbey.

This is the back of Bath Abbey.

#1 is the restored townhome which you can tour. It is at the front corner of the crescent.

#1 is the restored town home which you can tour. It is at the front corner of the crescent.

The Royal Crescent.

The Royal Crescent.

The Royal Crescent from the other end.

The Royal Crescent from the other end.

Christina and I at the Royal Crescent

Christina and I at the Royal Crescent

18th century gowns in the Fashion Museum.

18th century gowns in the Fashion Museum.

This black brocaded 18th century gown was particularly striking.

This black brocaded 18th century gown was particularly striking.

Two 18th century mantuas (court gowns). In front a miniature which was taken around to share designs. This was in lieu of a sketch or illustration.

Two 18th century mantuas (court gowns). In front a miniature which was taken around to share designs. This was in lieu of a sketch or illustration.

Menswear - early 19th century. Note the elaborate embroidery of the coat on the right.

Menswear – early 19th century. Note the elaborate embroidery of the coat on the right.

Early 20th century. The museum houses an EXTENSIVE collection.  This part of the exhibition is designed to give the audience an idea. This is one of several booths with clothes displayed with boxes showing how the museum stores garments not on display.  The boxes in the photo represent other garments in storage.

Early 20th century. The museum houses an EXTENSIVE collection. This part of the exhibition is designed to give the audience an idea. This is one of several booths with clothes displayed with boxes showing how the museum stores garments not on display. The boxes in the photo represent other garments in storage.

Lunch in this cafe -Carluccios.

Lunch in this cafe -Carluccios.

These are the Parade Gardens next to the River Avon.

These are the Parade Gardens next to the River Avon.

Standing on Bridge Street looking back to the River Avon.

Standing on Bridge Street looking back to the River Avon.